On the Origins Bibliography

I wanted to start a post that serves as a running tally of all of the stuff I’ve been reading for the Tor.com column that can be referred back to if you’re interested in that sort of thing. It’ll be updated as I go. This bibliography is current as of 7/9/18, and includes all works read for the first three columns, and the upcoming posts for July and August 2018.

History of science reference texts:

  • The Gene: An Intimate History (2016) by Siddharta Mukherjee
  • A Short History of Nearly Everything (2003) by Bill Bryson
  • The Scientists: A History of Science Told Through the Lives of its Greatest Inventors (2002) by John Gribbin
  • The Origin of Species (1859) by Charles Darwin
  • The Autobiography of Charles Darwin, 1809-82 (1887) by Charles Darwin
  • Voyage of the Beagle (1939) by Charles Darwin
  • An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798) by Thomas Malthus
  • Daedalus; Or Science and the Future (1924) by J.B.S. Haldane
  • Evolution: The Modern Synthesis (1942) by Julian Huxley
  • The Double Helix (1968) by James D. Watson
  • What is Life? (1944) by Erwin Schrödinger
  • The Eighth Day of Creation: Makers of the Revolution in Biology (1996) by Horace Freeland Judson

History of science fiction reference texts/Biographies:

  • Science Fiction: A Very Short Introduction (2011) by David Seed
  • The History of Science Fiction (2006) by Adam Charles Roberts
  • The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction (2011) by John Clute, Peter Nicholls, John Grant
  • The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction (2003) by Edward James
  • Olaf Stapledon: Speaking for the Future (1994) by Robert Crossley
  • The Astounding Illustrated History of Science Fiction (2017) by Dave Golder and Jess Nevins

Books/Movies:

  • 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1870) by Jules Verne
  • The Time Machine (1895) by H.G. Wells
  • The Island of Dr. Moreau (1896) by H.G. Wells
  • Metropolis (1927) by Fritz Lang
  • We (1924) by Yevgeny Zamyatin
  • The Fatal Eggs (1925) by Mikhail Bulgakov
  • R.U.R. (1921) by Karel Capek
  • Brave New World (1932) by Aldous Huxley
  • Island (1962) by Aldous Huxley
  • A Princess of Mars (1912) by Edgar Rice Burroughs
  • The Gods of Mars (1913) by Edgar Rice Burroughs
  • Triplanetary (1934) by E.E. “Doc” Smith
  • The Skylark of Space (1928) by E.E. “Doc” Smith
  • Armageddon 2419 (1928) by Philip Francis Nowlan
  • The Moon Pool (1918) by Abraham Grace Merritt
  • Odd John: A Story Between Jest and Earnest (1935) by Olaf Stapledon
  • Last and First Men: A Story of the Near and Far Future (1930) by Olaf Stapledon
  • Star Maker (1937) by Olaf Stapledon
  • Who Goes There? (1938) by John W. Campbell

Read, but not referenced:

  • Frankenstein (1823) by Mary Shelley
  • The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886) by Robert Lewis Stevenson
  • The Lost World (1912) by Arthur Conan Doyle
  • Tarzan of the Apes (1912) by Edgar Rice Burroughs
  • The Metamorphosis (1915) by Franz Kafka

Referenced, but not read:

  • Principles of Geology (1830) by Charles Lyell
  • Utopia (1516) by Thomas More
  • Republic (381 BC) by Plato
  • The War of the Worlds (1897) by H.G. Wells
  • Anticipations (1901) by H.G Wells
  • The Rights of Man: Or What Are We Fighting For? (1940) by H.G. Wells
  • The Tempest (1611) by William Shakespeare
  • My Life and Work (1922) by Henry Ford
  • Point Counter Point (1928) by Aldous Huxley
  • The Mechanism of Mendelian Hereditary (1915) by Thomas Hunt Morgan
  • The Doors of Perception (1954) by Aldous Huxley

 

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One Response to On the Origins Bibliography

  1. Pingback: Radium, Dinosaurs and Ridiculous Cakes | Kelly Lagor's Lagoraphobia

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